How to talk about your mental health?

 How to talk about your mental health? 

How to talk about your mental health?  ichhori.com


While one in five people will experience a diagnosable mental health condition in their lives, five out of five people will go through a challenging time that affects their mental health. There are simple things that each person can say or do to assist the people in their life who are struggling to urge through the tough times.
This worksheet from Mental Health America’s in the year 2020 Mental Health Month Toolkit can help you think about how to start this conversation.
Here are some more recommendations on the way to ask someone about their mental health:
Practice active listening
Active listening is different from just hearing what a person has to say. A good active listener:

  •  Puts everything aside and provides their complete attention to the one that is talking
  •  Asks open-ended questions to get more details about the topic that is being discussed (“And how did that make you feel?”)
  •  Takes moments throughout the conversation to summarize what they have been told and make sure they are understanding clearly

Do not compare

If a lover or loved one goes through a troublesome situation and that they come to you for support, you would possibly feel tempted to inform them about something that happened to you and the way you were ready to get through it. It is okay to share similar experiences, but take care to not compare. It can make someone desire their pain is not valid. For instance, if they are telling you a few breakups, do not mention how you had a way harder divorce. Focus on what you did to cope with feelings of loss or loneliness.
Ask what you can do
It can be tempting to assume what would be helpful to someone who is struggling, but it is always better to ask them what they need from you. If you ask and get a response like, “nothing, I am fine,” offers up a few suggestions for things you would be willing to do (without being pushy). For instance, you could offer to come to sit with them and watch a movie, cook them a meal, or pick up a few things for them at the store.
Keep your word
If you have got offered your support to someone and told them you would do something, keep your word. When an individual is struggling, the last item they have is to feel abandoned by somebody else. If you absolutely can not honour your promise, make a sincere apology and find another time that you can do what you said you would.
Do not judge
To be truly supportive of somebody, you would like to place your personal opinions and biases aside. They may be struggling because of a mistake that they made, or you may think that they are overreacting, but you will never know what it is truly like to be that person during this moment, and criticism is not helpful to their recovery.
Offer to join them
When someone is going through a time of sadness or uncertainty, their emotions can take over and leave them feeling paralyzed and unable to take care of life’s obligations. Offering to travel with someone to assist them lookout for responsibilities like walking the dog, getting to the grocery store, attending doctor appointments, or learning the dry cleaning can help them feel a sense of accomplishment and lift their spirits.
Know when more serious help is needed
Sometimes the support that you can offer won’t be enough. If you notice that your friend or loved one continues to struggle after weeks or months, they will be showing signs of a psychological state condition and certain need professional help. Do not be afraid to encourage them to seek help from a mental health professional and offer to help them find a provider if needed. If someone you care about is in immediate danger of taking suicidal action, seek help. Trained crisis counsellors are available 24/7 by texting “MHA” to 741-741 or calling 1-800-273-TALK(8255).
SOURCE
https://screening.mhanational.org/content/7-tips-talking-loved-one-about-their-mental-health/


Previous Post Next Post